Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Wednesday Dog Ears


This week's "Dog Ears" features a writer coattail-riding Ayn Rand to success as well as ways for you to do the same:
  • Tor.com features a powerful short story by Rachel Swirsky, "A Memory of Wind," which explores the Agammemnon-Iphigenia myth.
  • Yet another Ayn Rand biography is released to capitalize on the Americans who count Atlas Shrugged as the most influential book they ever read.  Next in the news, I can't believe that Atlas Shrugged is supposed to be the second-most influential book in America.  Blech.
  • David L. Ulin wrote a fairly intereting piece in the LA Times entitled, "The Lost Art of Reading," which is both accurate (in that it details some of the problems I've had with reading) and disheartening (in that it makes me worry about the kids who are growing up today and the problems that they'll face reading).
  • Jane Airhead, a children's book by Kay Woodward, tells the story of Charlotte, a girl who decides to find a "Mr. Rochester" for her mom.  "So when Charlotte finds the ideal man, she can’t believe her luck. He’s dark, brooding and mysterious. He’s PERFECT. But the real-life romantic hero also turns out to be sarcastic and rude. Does Charlotte really want her mum marrying him?"  Did Kate Beaton read this before she drew "Dude Watching with the Brontes"?
  • 60 Second Recap offers students short clips that sum up aspects of culturally-relevant novels and plays in a minute.
  • "Making Money Reading Books" at InfoBarrel tells how to "get in on some of the money generated from their books by blogging on the coat tails of [your favorite author's] success."  While this definitely has some potential, don't you dare try to publish your blog, or J.K. Rowling will make you cry in public.

6 comments:

Homero said...

Your Rand comment reminded me of this:
https://www.contrariwise.org/tag/ayn-rand

Lindsay-with-an-A said...

HOW HAVE I NEVER HEARD OF THAT SITE BEFORE? That's totally awesome. I'm totally blogging about it...

Homero said...

I thought the same thing when I saw the site. OF course, it's a lot of really cliche and hipterish ink (LOTS of 'so it goes', and "Where the Wild Things Are") but cool none the less. Makes me want to get one.

Homero said...

Thought you might like this as well:
http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/07/10/if-public-libraries-didnt-exist-could-you-start-one-today/

Daniele said...

I just read "A Memory of Wind" and found it very enjoyable. I love retellings of myths and fairy tales, especially when told from a different point of view or in a different setting. This one took a character barely mentioned in passing and gave readers a reason to care to remember her name. I did think it was funny just how many posts found the story "haunting"

Lindsay-with-an-A said...

To be honest, I've never described a story as haunting. Creepy, yes. (I'm thinking Edgar Allan Poe.) Sad, yes. (I cried like a baby at the end of HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE.) But haunting, which I generally think of as scary/creepy mixed with sad, I have never used.

Related Posts with Thumbnails